Skip to content

Meet the Moderators

Meet the Moderators of these forums

Meet them all

Meet the Experts

Meet the Experts in these forums

Forum

You are in... Forums > Photo Chat > Photo Chat > Questions, questions, questions?

Got something to say?

Got something to say?

Go to most recent reply

edgodden

Joined:

Nov 10

Posts: 14

edgodden says:

Questions, questions, questions?

Hi everyone!

Here at PP we're always keen to hear your photo questions and problems. What lens should I use for portraits? Where should I get my kit insured? How do I clean my kit?... the list goes on.

Well... as of next month we're trying harder than ever before to answer your questions in a new 'How do I ?...' feature.

So get your thinking caps on and send us some photo-related questions to this thread.

Look forward to hearing from you all,

Ed

PP TECHNIQUE WRITER

Reply to this Topic 

 
BenElliott

Joined:

Jul 07

Posts: 1440

BenElliott says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Here's one, Ed. Somehow I have a small piece of dirt behind the rear element of a lens. How do I get it out? I can clone it out but I would prefer not to have it there at all.

"I am pleased to say that our results are very much in line with plan. All we have to do now is find out what the plan was."

Reply to this Topic 

StephenBatey

Joined:

Nov 05

Posts: 10210

StephenBatey says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

How do other people dry sheet film?

Old photographers never die - they just stop developing

Reply to this Topic 

Barry Howes

Joined:

May 08

Posts: 11636

Barry Howes says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Well SB for my 35mm film I made a Custom Cage from Aluminium and pop rivets with an electric fan and a light bulb for a bit of heat over which the air flowed. Also had a similar Heath Robinson contraption for drying up to 10 10X8 prints.

Reply to this Topic 

StephenBatey

Joined:

Nov 05

Posts: 10210

StephenBatey says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Ah, clearly the question wasn't clear. "Sheet film" means single sheets of film, rather than roll film like 35mm or 120/200. Roll films all have leaders and trailers that allow easy attachment of clips to weight the bottom end and suspend from the top. Sheet film has an unused margin which is only the size of the blanking effect of the film holder, meaning that it is rather more difficult to clip without going into the image area. Fuji Acros film comes with a hole already made in the image area to allow you to hand it up - and cause problems with composing to allow for the hole that has to be cloned out or scalpeled out afterwards on the print.

I should have made that part clearer, as I intended to ask more about suspension methods than film driers.

Old photographers never die - they just stop developing

Reply to this Topic 

Barry Howes

Joined:

May 08

Posts: 11636

Barry Howes says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Ah, never having used sheet film you have the advantage of me. Now how about exposing a wider area than you want for a particular Masterpiece to give you some margin to Clip? How does one go about developing & Printing  sheet film in the Darkroom? Never actually thought about this one.

Reply to this Topic 

silversnapper1

Joined:

Jan 09

Posts: 2913

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

No matter what filters I use and where I take my exposures from I never seem to be able to shoot a decent sunrise or sunset without resorting to photoshop. I end up with blown skies or silhouetted landscape. What am I doing wrong?

Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Dylan Thomas

Reply to this Topic 

garry442

Joined:

Mar 08

Posts: 12249

garry442 says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

silversnapper1 said:

No matter what filters I use and where I take my exposures from I never seem to be able to shoot a decent sunrise or sunset without resorting to photoshop. I end up with blown skies or silhouetted landscape. What am I doing wrong?


------ End Quote ------

Such highly contrasting light differences are always going to be a major problem Steve. Have you tried bracketing three shots or more and then combining to make an HDR ?

Attached images:

  1. cd31 (154)  

You'd better come up smelling sweet, because you're a long time stinking

Reply to this Topic 

silversnapper1

Joined:

Jan 09

Posts: 2913

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Yeah, I've done thr HDR bit Garry but I think that I should be able to do it in camera with the filters that I have.

Nice shot btw. Didn't realise that you had snow in Manchester at this time of year.

Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Dylan Thomas

Reply to this Topic 

Flpper1974

Joined:

Dec 09

Posts: 1048

Flpper1974 says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

Good morning Steve, I would persist with the ND Grads personally. What I would suggest is making sure you get to the spot really early so you're set up, composed and ready to get the shot. The perfect moment often occurs and is over very quickly so its good to be prepared. What ND grads are you using out of interest? I use a Cokin P grads ranging from 1-3 stops of filtration. For seascapes and flat landscapes I like to use a hard edged grad. I always shoot in manual and spot meter from the foreground so its correctly exposed before I put on the ND grad.
Si
silversnapper1 said:

Yeah, I've done thr HDR bit Garry but I think that I should be able to do it in camera with the filters that I have.

Nice shot btw. Didn't realise that you had snow in Manchester at this time of year.


------ End Quote ------

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

Reply to this Topic 

garry442

Joined:

Mar 08

Posts: 12249

garry442 says:

Re: Questions, questions, questions?

silversnapper1 said:

Yeah, I've done thr HDR bit Garry but I think that I should be able to do it in camera with the filters that I have.

Nice shot btw. Didn't realise that you had snow in Manchester at this time of year.


------ End Quote ------

It depends what effect you are after Steve. Grad filters would do the job if there is a clear line between the sunset and foreground, a seascape for example. I'm not sure they will be so effective if you want to include buildings etc. The structures would become darker at the bottom. I doubt you will achieve a stunning sunset whilst keeping all the foreground detail, by using one shot, that's why I prefer to use HDR.  Remember to set your white balance to 'shade' or 'cloudy' and take a few at different times, you'll be surprised how quickly the colours change in a matter of minutes. Good luck.

[This Reply has been modified by the Author]

You'd better come up smelling sweet, because you're a long time stinking

Reply to this Topic 

Page

Post a message in Photo Chat

To post a reply to this topic, please Log In.

Terms of use

Use of our community areas and forums is subject to important terms of use. By joining our community and using the features you agree to be bound by these terms. Read full terms of use


Most popular

Latest posts